The Most Hon. Edward Seaga's Presentation to Parliament on October 9, 2012

Release Date: 
Tuesday, October 9, 2012 - 17:45

AGA O.N. PC.
LLD (HON.) Dlitt. (HON.)
SO FAR AND YET SO NEAR
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ADDRESS BY:
THE MOST HON. EDWARD SEAGA O.N. PC.
LLD (HON.) Dlitt. (HON.)
Tuesday, October 9th 2012
2:00pm
On the Occasion of the Joint Meeting of the Houses of Parliament
at
George William Gordon House
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Quotations
“….I made the sacrifice of my own well-being and that of my family because of the
mission which called me to enter political life to help those who could not lift their own
burdens….”
“The period marked a point of settlement of the political problem of whether the
future of the country rested in the Federation of the West Indies or in seeking
independence on its own…”
“….In the 1970s, a new ideological order was adopted. Shifting from economic to
social and political priorities, socialism, through its corner-stone policy of distribution
of wealth to achieve egalitarianism, attempted to create an egalitarian society. It did
not take long to learn from bitter experience, that the poor cannot be elevated by
pulling down the rich, but by pulling up the poor. Nor could the worthy social
programmes of socialism, nor the policy of controlling ownership of the heights of the
economy be secured and sustained with little available cash….”
“………The cost was 45% of the GDP, ranking Jamaica third on the list of
countries experiencing economic cataclysms. Only Argentina (55%) and
Indonesia (50%) were more severe……”
“……..The gap in the interdigitated structure of the two Jamaicas, is
closing on all fronts, but too slowly. In systems of governance, populism
continues to show strength, because the economy continues to show
weakness…….”
“…….The Jamaican government must put aside its timidity and embrace the policy of
the pegged exchange rate….”
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Table of Contents
Overview ................................................................................................. 7
45 years Of Service ................................................................................ 8
50th anniversary of Independence ...................................................... 9
Anniversaries are important milestones ............................................. 9
A point of settlement of the political problem ................................. 9
Four national elections in five years ................................................... 9
Different belief systems ....................................................................... 10
West Indies Federation ....................................................................... 10
The 1950s and 1960s ............................................................................ 11
1970’s .................................................................................................... 12
1980’s .................................................................................................... 12
1990’s Financial Melt down ................................................................. 13
Overview .............................................................................................. 13
Authorities September 1991 fateful decision .................................. 14
Exchange rate soared through the roof ......................................... 15
The cost was 45% of the GDP ............................................................ 15
Economic growth stagnated ............................................................ 15
Framework of different orders and belief systems ........................... 16
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1970’s .................................................................................................... 16
Determined drive to rebuild the nation in the 1980’s. ................... 17
Lessons to Be learned from Importing Belief systems ...................... 18
Jamaican Policy Makers .................................................................... 18
Overview .............................................................................................. 18
“Their shoes did not fit our feet” ....................................................... 19
The Rule Of Law .................................................................................... 20
Charter of Rights .................................................................................. 20
Public Defender and the Contractor General ............................... 21
The two Jamaica’s ............................................................................... 21
System and order ................................................................................ 22
Corruption ............................................................................................ 22
Youth ..................................................................................................... 22
Women ................................................................................................. 22
The reasons for a no-growth .............................................................. 23
The protection of Jamaica’s interests,............................................. 24
Too much politics in politics ................................................................ 24
The solution is in pulling up, not pulling down, ................................ 24
A dysfunctional education system .................................................... 25
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Sloganeering education is not the solution. ................................... 26
Disillusioned young people ................................................................ 26
Respect and Justice ............................................................................ 27
Jamaican Women ............................................................................... 28
The betterment of Jamaica ................................................................ 29
A credible vision .................................................................................. 30
The musical heritage .......................................................................... 30
The wealth of talent in sports ............................................................ 30
The world of industry and services .................................................... 31
Remittance flows from abroad ......................................................... 31
Jamaica’s Strategic Location ............................................................. 32
Embrace the policy of the pegged exchange rate ........................ 33
The enormous potential ..................................................................... 34
Change the vision of the country .................................................... 35
Jamaican Flag .................................................................................... 35
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Overview
I am most pleased to be in this august chamber of
Parliament once more, this time as a guest of the
Houses of Parliament. I am also pleased to have some
of my family with me and many of my extended family
and friends from the areas which were my political
home for 45 years.
I have been invited here by you to hear your testimonies
on my role as an architect, engineer and builder in
shaping the political landscape of our development
over the first 50 years of independence. May I thank you
for the many kind and thoughtful observations proposed
in your tributes. Few persons on this little island whose
people hold to firm political views can claim to have
become a product of parliament rather than party. I
am happy to be cast today in a broader role than I
have enjoyed in my parliamentary years and thank
Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller, Leader of the
Opposition Andrew Holness and the legislators gathered
here for making this session possible.
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45 years Of Service
When I retired from active political representation more
than seven years ago, it was after giving unbroken
service for some 45 years, two of which were in the
Legislative Council (now the Senate). Parliament has not
been unmindful of the fact that my parliamentary
service has been a journey for more than two-thirds of
my adult life. I made the sacrifice of my own well-being
and that of my family because of the mission which
called me to enter political life to help those who could
not lift their own burdens. It gave me the greatest
pleasure to know that, where possible, my life could
help change their lives to lessen their burdens. The smile
of a gleeful child, the hug of an agonized mother and
the tears of appreciation of the elderly poor have been
my reward. It is these rewards that made it possible to
stand before you here today with a record of not only
45 years of sacrifice and service but with an
unquestionable score sheet of integrity which to me is
more powerful than dollars. I thank you all for the times
when you held my hands.
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50th anniversary of Independence
Anniversaries are important milestones
This year Jamaica commemorated its 50th anniversary of
Independence. Anniversaries are important milestones
which should be marked: some for review of the past,
others for a look into the future. This particular occasion
should feature both a review of the past and reflections
on the future.
A point of settlement of the political problem
Jamaicans greeted independence in 1962 with relief for
more than one reason. The period marked a point of
settlement of the political problem of whether the future
of the country rested in the Federation of the West Indies
or in seeking independence on its own. The decision by
referendum in 1961 was independence on our own.
Four national elections in five years
The other area of relief was the end of a period through
which the country had just passed with an
unprecedented four national elections in five years,
each of which aroused its own uneasiness and
foreboding, a period of stress, strain and electoral
fatigue.
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Different belief systems
No understanding of this phase of independence can
be meaningful without reviewing different belief systems
adopted by the political leadership. Each of these belief
systems was a new order expected to serve as an
umbrella framework to determine development policies.
The shifting focus from one order to another, occurring
from decade to decade, was designed to lift
development prospects to higher levels. But, beginning
with the Federation, they did not.
West Indies Federation
The West Indies Federation was based on the
expectation that the people of 10 Caribbean
territories could become one nation inspired by a
cross-border brotherhood of similar race and culture
that would kindle a flame of solidarity and heighten
prospects for the future.
Any reality check in the early years would have
realised this the grand federal design would be
politically unworkable because of the inevitable
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conflict of priorities among the member countries
which, as poor countries, had to put self-interest first.
Recognising that those conflicts would have created
insoluble problems, would have saved more than a
wasted decade of dreams.
The 1950s and 1960s
In the 1950s and 1960s, the dominant economic order
was the need for foreign investment to establish
manufacturing and industrial projects which could
create jobs for the labour force. These investments
were invited with offers of generous tax and non-tax
incentives to encourage job creation. But the reality
check, years later, showed that relatively few jobs
were created by these capital intensive industries
and, further, a substantial amount of revenue was
foregone and foreign exchange expended to sustain
their operations. The cost was greater than the return.
Mostly, for more than a decade, it was a misdirected
use of time and effort.
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1970’s
In the 1970s, a new ideological order was adopted.
Shifting from economic to social and political priorities,
socialism, through its corner-stone policy of
distribution of wealth to achieve egalitarianism,
attempted to create an egalitarian society. It did not
take long to learn from bitter experience, that the
poor cannot be elevated by pulling down the rich,
but by pulling up the poor. Nor could the worthy
social programmes of socialism, nor the policy of
controlling ownership of the heights of the economy
be secured and sustained with little available cash.
Another decade was lost because the reality checks
were ignored by the overpowering euphoria of the
message that “socialism is love”. Again, this ideology
proved that it was not the way forward. In fact, it
virtually died along the way.
1980’s
A dramatic about-turn in the 1980s raised the need
for competitiveness to the level of a new economic
order by minimizing the public sector as an agent of
production and maximizing the private sector as the
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agent of growth. This was achievable, in part, by
divesting public assets. To achieve competitiveness,
macro-economic stability had to be created. This
stability, in the dictum of the IMF, had to be anchored
by leveraging the exchange rate, adjusting it
regularly to be competitive. But the problem was
that each adjustment of the exchange rate created
a new cycle of price increases which reduced
competitiveness and economic growth. This was a
vicious circle which forced me to intervene with a
demand in 1986-1987 that the IMF discontinue the
self-defeating policy. After a tense period, the IMF
finally agreed and the dramatic economic upturn
which followed after 15 years, significantly helped to
transform the struggling Jamaican economy to a
restoration of growth by 1987. This signalled a way
forward.
1990’s Financial Melt down
Overview
The most calamitous plague of the failed systems and
orders which beset the Jamaican economy in post14
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Independence was the financial meltdown of the
1990’s. The new government of the period allowed
the IMF to guide it through the wilderness of the
capitalist market economy. It was prompted to
abandon the auction system which had maintained
a stable, pegged exchange rate for more than two
years with growth for the economy. This caused the
rate of exchange to move perilously. Within 17
months into the new term, the exchange rate fell
from J$1.00 equal US$0.18, to J$1.00 equivalent to
US$0.07. Panic set in. Unfamiliar with the mechanisms
of the market system, government allowed itself to be
persuaded to prematurely remove the restrictions on
foreign exchange moving freely in and out of the
country.
Authorities September 1991 fateful decision
In September, 1991, the authorities made a fateful
decision which precipitated an economic cataclysm.
Exchange Control Regulations which prohibited the
export of foreign exchange were repealed, opening
the door for capital flight without the Bank of
Jamaica having reserves to satisfy the outflow. The
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expected compensating inflows of foreign exchange,
never really materialised.
Exchange rate soared through the roof
With the door now open for capital flight, the
exchange rate soared through the roof, interest rates
and inflation zoomed through the windows and
economic growth plunged through the floor. All but
a small number of financial institutions collapsed. This
was the beginning of an economic meltdown which
eventually cost the government $140 billion in
compensation to failed institutions to enable them to
protect depositors.
The cost was 45% of the GDP
The cost was 45% of the GDP, ranking Jamaica third
on the list of countries experiencing economic
cataclysms. Only Argentina (55%) and Indonesia
(50%) were more severe.
Economic growth stagnated
Economic growth stagnated, the budget was once
again in deficit, inflation and debt were intractably
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cemented at globally extreme levels. Ironically, in a
climate of no growth or little growth, unemployment
decreased. So did the Poverty Index, in part,
because frantic relatives abroad rushed rescue
packages of remittances and barrels of goodies to
help families to weather the hardships. Government
also introduced effective poverty reduction measures.
Whatever the reason for this mixture of good and ill
fortune, the meltdown conditions calcified into
economic stagnation for some two decades,
indicating that this was not a way forward.
Framework of different orders and belief systems
1970’s
Within this framework of different orders and belief
systems, the 1970s was the most dynamic period, in
that it provoked a furore with attacks on the
establishment. In retaliation, the attackers attracted
an onslaught of responses as deterrents, creating
great confrontation and conflict. Notably, a
highlight was the introduction of far-reaching social
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legislation by Michael Manley, which helped greatly
in defining a social order. But most of all, the decade
raised the consciousness of political thought with a
passion forcing everyone to appreciate the interplay
of politics with the rest of society and to decide
whether they would stand and fight, or flee in fright,
or indeed embrace the new order.
Determined drive to rebuild the nation in the 1980’s.
Equally sharing this passion was the determined drive
to rebuild the nation in the 1980’s. In a decade,
tainted with the struggle against an imponderable
global recession, our challenge was to reverse the
legacy of the 1970’s of a near- collapsed economy,
overcome the ravages of the worst global recession
in fifty years, rebuild and restore a battered country
from the devastation of the worst-ever hurricane,
while creating an economy which was renewed,
revitalized, reformed and recovering. We met this
challenge, in the decade.
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Lessons to Be learned from Importing Belief systems
There are many lessons to learn about surviving
snares and pitfalls by devising our own strategies that
work rather than accepting, willingly, or unwillingly,
the imported belief systems which others think must
be made to work. The same brain-washed mentality
that proclaimed everything from the Great House to
be good and better, is the same one which dictates
that imported investment, imported socialism,
imported federalism, imported IMF dictates and
imported globalization are all “good and better”.
They are, but only in part. We must determine what
is good and reject vehemently what is not, or we will
become modern day slaves to new masters in a new
colonial-like regime making true independence a
fiction.
Jamaican Policy Makers
Overview
Jamaica’s misfortune is that policy makers have little
agreed polices or agreed principles on which to
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devise sustainable strategies which can pass the
baton successfully from one runner to the next.
Hence, the end result of the relay is a nonproductive
path of batons that are fumbled and
dropped and runners who take two steps forward
and two steps backward. Time now to stop
following and fumbling! Time to lead the way!
“Their shoes did not fit our feet”
I contested all these systems of imposition from
federalism to certain aspects of globalisation. Their
shoes did not fit our feet. It was in the last half of the
1980s, free of IMF tentacles on the exchange rate,
free of the investment mantra that all foreign
investment is good and should be incentivised, free
of IMF dogma not to peg the exchange rate and
free of the rigidities of liberalisation that the public
sector must not own any means of production, that
we rallied and crafted our own labour-intensive,
stable macro-economic model of a mixed economy
which restored growth, achieved record job
creation with 100,000 new jobs and lowered inflation.
And we did so by energizing the people-based
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sectors with expansion of wage earning programmes.
This was the way forward.
The Rule Of Law
The rule of law is the most fundamental of all the
foundations of governance in civilized society. It
must not be a tissue-based fiction for the benefit of
the privileged.
Charter of Rights
A sweeping programme of constitutional reforms
began in 1992. In 1994 I introduced the need for
special treatment of the human rights section of the
Constitution to provide for a Charter of Rights and
Freedoms to close the loopholes of injustice and
broaden the rights of the people, particularly the
poor and vulnerable. This would greatly assist to
close the gap between the two Jamaicas by
making all Jamaicans first class citizens. Some fifteen
years passed while the Charter continued to
flounder as a work in progress in Parliament,
seemingly because the political authorities were not
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enthused about shifting power from the state to the
people to stop the abuse of human rights by the
state.
Public Defender and the Contractor General
Thankfully, the Charter is now law, but, regretfully, so
far, with plenty bark and little bite unless the
effective machinery for penalties are provided to
the Public Defender and the Contractor General to
impose sanctions for abuse of rights and freedoms of
the people and improprieties in business and
governance. Few actions of the state are more
important to be done now unless the real agenda is
to leave wide open doors for the rampage of
injustice and corruption to continue to wreak havoc
on the society, creating a shameful legacy for the
next 50 years.
The two Jamaica’s
The gap in the interdigitated structure of the two
Jamaicas, is closing on all fronts, but too slowly. In
systems of governance, populism continues to show
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strength, because the economy continues to show
weakness.
System and order
System and order are creeping into haphazard
management, but indiscipline is broader and
deeper.
Corruption
Corruption continues to spread from strength to
strength in financial schemes and other operational
modes. Virtually everyman, it seems, has a price,
because it is everyman for himself in a society of
greed. The frills of the society indicate progress, but
the fundamentals do not. “Politics” reigns supreme
with self-interest at the core.
Youth
Youth are polarizing: entrenching the worst and
intensifying the best.
Women
Women are Jamaica’s stars. Their future is
Jamaica’s future. How things have changed, but
not always for the better!
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The reasons for a no-growth
With these experiences absorbed I can see clearly
the reasons for a no-growth, low-growth, stagnant
economy. The economic gains were never given a
chance to be consolidated and accumulated. They
were wiped away, sometimes for ideological reasons,
at other times by the intense desire to deny paternity
for progress to others, or to claim innovation for self.
This is the political culture. Twice the economy
reached robust levels, (in the late 1960s and 1980s)
and twice it was ambushed by reckless policies, or a
misunderstanding of how the economic system
should work. But most damaging of all was the failure
to maintain the policy of a pegged exchange rate,
adopted in all the more successful economies of the
region, preferring to follow the few who were riding
the slippery slope of an erratic, plunging exchange
rate. This helped to create a prolonged, stagnant,
failing Jamaican economy unknown anywhere else
among the English-speaking countries of the region
or, indeed, as now revealed by the World Economic
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Forum in January, any other country in the world.
And yet there is no regret.
The protection of Jamaica’s interests,
Meanwhile, regional and global schemes that would
fail any cost/benefit test on the protection of
Jamaica’s interests, were gullibly swallowed and are
still being forcefully promoted. Even if the body is
now independent, the mind, it seems, is not. Every
misconceived change is a start-over in which the
loser is the Jamaican economy with new and bigger
sacrifices to try to catch-up. On this basis, it will
never return to the days of greater glory!
Too much politics in politics
There is too much politics in politics. If there was less
politics, politics would be able to do what politics
should do, develop Jamaica.
The solution is in pulling up, not pulling down,
The problem is in the means to the end. The solution
is in pulling up, not pulling down, nor indeed, pulling
apart. Pulling apart the layers of racialism was not a
matter of peeling, and unwrapping layer by layer.
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The layers are inter-digitated with anti-social
rejections. Separating the layers is a complex and
delicate process. Inevitably, this would uncover the
social embitterment of disrespect that aggravates
the complex problems of the social order. Pulling up
avoids this disintegration.
The process of pulling up to earn more is best driven
by systems to learn more. All societies thrive on
educational training to create a productive labour
force to promote growth. A society with a failed
education system cannot generate products of
merit with a claim to economic value, social respect,
or national pride. There is no educated country that
is poor; no poor country that is educated! That is the
key!
A dysfunctional education system
In a dysfunctional education system in which more
than 70% of graduates, fail to matriculate, frustration
and anger are the outcomes if the oppressive social
system cannot be pulled down and the education
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system cannot be pulled up; if the economy is
shackled by limited opportunities for producing
legitimate wealth and the disrespected masses have
ladders that are too short to scale the walls of
deprivation, then the inevitable recourse is the illegal
routes of illegitimate pursuits: crime and drugs.
Check the corners in inner city communities and the
shop steps in rural areas and the “wutless boys” and
“careless gals” will be found because we put them
there.
Sloganeering education is not the solution.
Sloganeering education is not the solution. It is
merely the expression of a device to talk-the-talk
without walking the walk. Educational reforms must
begin where education begins: reading, writing and
arithmetic.
Disillusioned young people
Far more disillusioned young people are being
produced annually, three out of every four, by a
malfunctioning education system than the limited
means of economic betterment can absorb. While
many fit into manpower needs uncomfortably, one
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way or the other, a good many are misfits ready for
solutions that are the easy way out.
Respect and Justice
At the root of all this are the self-serving
interpretations of respect and justice.
I quote from The Folk Roots of Cultural Identity, my
inaugural address at the University of the West Indies,
May 2005:
“A sense of justice is fundamental to the
traditional Jamaican psyche. There is good
reason for this. Respect and justice go hand in
hand. Justice is an unrequited need; respect is
a badge of honour. ‘Is injustice’; ‘is
disadvantage’; ‘is disrespect’ are familiar cries.
There is a sense of natural law defining justice in
Jamaican society which demands that
‘respect due’ always.
This natural law of justice incorporates a legal
basis but also involves a wider concept of
social justice which itself includes all manner of
wrongs: bad roads, lack of water, poor schools,
and uncaring medical attention are as much
an injustice as an act of terror, because it is an
offence against those who have neither wealth
nor privilege to protect themselves.
Through the eyes of the underprivileged, the
concept of injustice does not fully include the
plight of the rich and powerful. It is felt that
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they must fend for themselves. In
underprivileged Jamaica where crossing over
to a better life is an obstacle course of shackles,
injustice is anything that makes life harder, while
so many enjoy it. This sets the tone for the wide
gap between the two Jamaicas”.
While justice is a pillar of stability, respect is the true
dynamic that drives the need to succeed, to be
‘somebody’.
Jamaican Women
Jamaican women ‘man’ half of the households of
Jamaica. The burden of domestic pressures
amazingly does not prevent many women from
pursuing careers which often require further training
or study. The core determination to “achieve” is part
of the assertive coping strategies of the challenging
and competitive upbringing which make many
women symbols of achievement in Jamaican
society. Women are bastions of the church, the
backbone of political support, determined players in
civic organizations, achievers in scholarship and a
source of great reliance at any workplace. As such,
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they are more than women or mothers; they are a
resource base of exceptional strength.
These strengths tame the flow of the consequential
disasters of an inconsequential economy, a
malfunctioning educational system and a turbulent
cultural milieu. They buy time to repair the breach.
The betterment of Jamaica
As one who fought from the inception of my career
in public service for the betterment of Jamaica and
for the birth of a Jamaican nation to foster stability,
create prosperity and induce harmony, allaying the
anxiety of the rich and quenching the anger of the
poor, I am not moved by all the “evidence” that in
the colonial period much of this hardship did not
exist. Independence did not bring such hardships to
our regional sister states; Independence has not
failed Jamaica; it is Jamaica which has failed
Independence, and it is Jamaicans who must re-set
the course to return it to its auspicious start. A
generational change is needed to return to the spirit
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of earlier pioneering years to start again to map a
new course to avoid prolonged distress.
A credible vision
After 50 years, Jamaica is today facing the future
without a credible vision. It is well that much of the
achievement of the post-Independence period,
although they are few, still have the life to continue
to contribute to nation building. But this perspective
is mostly short term.
The musical heritage
The musical heritage, reggae, which propelled us to
centre stage in the cultural world, having made an
indelible imprint, gestated by young people rich in
creativity, is one of the stunning successes of the
past 50 years. But with signs of fraility emerging, the
question must be asked, how much longer can the
impetus of this music endure without re-inventing
itself?
The wealth of talent in sports
The wealth of talent in sports, particularly track and
field, allowed us to stun the world with a triumphant
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display of Jamaican athletic prowess at the Olympic
and World games which must rank as one of the
greatest achievements of the post-Independence
period, indeed, one of the great achievements of
Olympic history. Long may this prowess of Jamaica
live to continue to bring us future glory; but sports, in
general, is a fickle area sustained by public
popularity.
The world of industry and services
The world of industry and services, has witnessed
remarkable Jamaican achievements, with and
without foreign partners, in the development of a
world class tourism industry which has reliably
become one of the corners stones of the Jamaican
economy. So too has there been, again starting from
scratch, a grand industrial development of a
bauxite/alumina industry. But the resource base of
both of these land mark developments have
limitations of exploitable new areas for expansion.
Remittance flows from abroad
These major achievements of the post-
Independence period are buttressed by remittance
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flows from abroad to families and for other purposes.
The spectacular increases in remittance flows since
1990 moved it to the top position in the Jamaican
economy for foreign-exchange inflows. But it too has
some limitations which are beyond domestic control.
Based on the background of these achievers which
together still fall far short of closing the foreign
exchange gap, what other untapped resource
bases exist to be exploited on a large scale. The
nation has to cease dreaming and become
visionaries of a future that can push the economy
and its workforce to new and greater heights.
Jamaica’s Strategic Location
For more than two decades, I have repeatedly
voiced the mantra that situated as we are virtually
on the coastline of the world’s richest economy,
Jamaica has no reason to be poor. Our proximity to
this great marketplace creates a centre of
preference for Jamaica to exploit in developing or
finishing products from the Far East (China, India)
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South America (Brazil) and even Europe utilizing
negotiated tax relief benefits of the Caribbean Basin
Initiative (CBI) for export duty-free entry to the US
market. For years, I have been promoting this idea,
based on reclaiming land in Kingston Harbour at Fort
Augusta. The proposal, whether at Fort Augusta or
Caymanas, makes sense in the same way that the
development of a massive garment industry
complex was established in the 1980’s for exporting
goods manufactured by Hong Kong firms in Jamaica
creating over 40,000 new jobs. It became a huge
foreign exchange earner for the economy.
Embrace the policy of the pegged exchange rate
Beyond this, the Jamaican government must put
aside its timidity and embrace the policy of the
pegged exchange rate which would:
 Reduce inflation to minimal levels;
 Lower the still high interest on commercial loan
rates of financial institutions to business-friendly
levels;
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 Reduce expenditure in the cost of servicing
external debt and making payments on interest,
profit and dividends earned by overseas
investment; and, indeed, reduce the stock of
debt;
 Open the door for potential massive inflows of
low interest foreign exchange for mortgage
financing and investment since the risk of
devaluation or depreciation of the rate of
exchange would no longer exist. This would be
revolutionary for attracting low-cost funds for
agriculture, education, infrastructure and low
cost housing creating thousands of new jobs;
 Most of all, it would restore the economic
growth which has been stagnant for two
decades because the increased prices which
follow devaluations would cease, ensuring that
none of the substance of growth would be
extracted from the GDP to pay the higher
prices of devaluations.
The enormous potential
35 | P a g e
The enormous potential which exists from this
proposal could, if properly investigated,
contracted and executed, result in huge
investment and jobs sufficient to make a dramatic
impact on the needs of the struggling economy.
Change the vision of the country
This is a future that could change the vision of the
country from hopelessness to hopefulness as
experienced in the earlier generational period of
post-Independent Jamaica; it could greatly assist
in winning the race between development and
discontent, and ensure that as we look to the
future we will never again grasp defeat from the
jaws of victory.
Jamaican Flag
Based on current perceptions, many feel that the
Jamaican flag should be flown upside down as
the accepted international signal of distress. But
the design of this flag is unusual. It is the same
pattern whether it is flown upside down or
downside up. Maybe this is meant to convey that
36 | P a g e
there will be no need to signal any lasting distress
in Jamaica if new visions replace age-old failures
with a new perspective of the future.

 

JLP MANIFESTO 2016 (PDF)

Featured Video - JLP Rally Sam Sharpe Square 2016